#FridayReads on the Radio. ONFM Book Club

ONFM Radio Logo

ONFM Radio Logo

I’ll be talking about #FridayReads and all things bookish with Disha Kaushik (@dishakaushik) on her ONFM Book Club show this Sunday, 9th October. The show is broadcast on ONFM Radio Station every week from 12pm to 1pm.

If you miss the show or are out of the area check Disha’s Facebook page for the SoundCloud podcast links on her Facebook Page.

Join in FridayReads?

FridayReads is the biggest Social Media book club out there. It was established on Twitter by Bethanne Patrick (@thebookmaven) way back in 2009 as a means of sharing the joy of reading with everyone! Since that time it has grown from just 300 hundred participants to a staggering 6000-8000 regulars, and it is still growing. FridayReads features regular giveaways to participants, all you need to do is share the title of what you are reading on: Twitter with the #FridayReads hashtag; on Facebook at our FridayReads page  or even on Tumblr. Feel free to visit and comment on fridayreads.com too, we love a good discussion!

Here is what Disha says about her show:

ONFM Book Club is a 1 hour show every Sunday. The show derived from my love of reading, I enjoy recommending books I have read to my friends, and thought it would be good to have a show focussing on book recommendations, and reviews for books I have read. We review the  books within the top 10 taken from The Waterstones official book chart. The show features guests, ranging from play writers and those that love reading. They discuss a book they have recently read, some of their favourite authors, books, if they are involved in the literature scene, they are given a platform to discuss their work. We encourage listener participation, they are given the chance to e-mail and text in their opinions on the books we have discussed, and offer book suggestions.

Disha has uploaded the interview to Soundcloud. You can listen to it here, just click the play button below.

Buck up your ideas BBC Books!

On World Book Night 2011 in the UK the BBC showed a program called The Books We Really Read presented by Sue Perkins. The BBC’s decision to focus their programming purely on the ‘literary fiction’ genre was in many people’s opinion flawed.

Science Fiction author Stephen Hunt (@SFCrowsnest) started the ball rolling with his vitriolic response to the coverage. Subsequently he has put together a petition of as many of the UK’s Science fiction authors as possible. Naturally the BBC is defending itself over the programme and subsequent discussion. There’s a good Guardian piece here with a bit more background.

So what do I think?

I reckon that Stephen Hunt is right to criticise the BBC. At present they are coming across as having a somewhat elitist view of what constitutes a good read without, it appears, having done any research. Hunt’s observation that the BBC was limited in outlook certainly stands. If there had been any evidence of joined-up thinking someone would have pointed out to the editors of The Books We Really Read and subsequent discussion programme that the BBC has a big SciFi output. Dr Who or Torchwood anyone?

In that case What Do People Really, Really Read?

I compile the Most Read list for FridayReads every week and there are always a few surprises but what always delights and amazes me is the sheer variety of books that people read. Only a small part of it fits in to that odd category of Literary Fiction. In fact I’d go so far as to say that Literary Fiction is the exception rather than the rule when readers make their choice.

Here is the most read list from FridayReads on 8th April 2011. I’ve added the Genre classifications, you can tell me if you disagree.

The top three are heavily promoted but do include real reading data so I’ve left them there for this list. If you have never joined in FridayReads before then you also need to know that the list changes every week. This is real reading data and is not based on sales data (eg Amazon).

The data is gathered from participants World Wide! It’s a global thing (thanks to @ibc4 for the prompt).

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Here are the numbers for each genre. Don’t try to add them up or do maths it won’t work as many books cover several genres!
1 action-adventure
3 autobiography
2 biography
1 children’s picture
5 contemporary
1 creative non-fiction
4 crime
1 crossover
1 drama
1 epic
1 faith
1 family saga
10 fantasy fiction
15 fiction
3 historical
3 historical fiction
2 horror
7 humour
2 magical realism
1 memoir
1 murder mystery
1 mystery
5 non-fiction
1 offbeat
2 paranormal fiction
1 philosophy
1 politics
1 popular science
1 post-modern
1 religion
2 romance
2 science-fiction
1 self-help
1 social
1 suspense-thriller
1 ya dystopian
3 ya fantasy
2 ya fiction
1 ya historical fiction
1 ya science-fiction

Good literature is more than books

Sometimes I get rather irked by the attitudes of those who teach my children. In this case I’m rather disappointed by the attitude of one of the senior teachers at my son’s school.

Recently it was World Book Day in the UK, celebrating the value of reading and promoting reading to children and their families. Great stuff. However the one thing that brought me up short was this excerpt from the letter to parents.

Children can come to school dressed as a book character from a children,s
book or from a traditional tale. We are asking that children stick to these two
categories rather than including comic heroes or film/cartoon characters. We
are aiming to use the day to promote reading good children’s books as much
as possible.

My italics!

So just what is wrong with comics? I can’t think of anything so I’ll state a few things that occur to me.

The comic form teaches narrative. There is an order to the frames and the frames contain speech bubbles and action. Sometimes the story is conveyed without any speech bubbles at all. We learn, visually, that there are many ways to tell a story. The Beano is so brilliant for this as there are so many different kinds of story there, especially when they run ‘Billy the Cat’ which is for the older kids.

Stereotypes and Archetypes appear throughout cartoons and early on introduce children to them in a visual manner. Whether you are looking at Spiderman and Superman comics or the Beano these characters are there. Super hero or super ordinary there is a metaphor for behaviour in there to learn from and discuss.

Exploration of Mores and Morals. The Green Goblin fought Spiderman, The Fantastic Four fought Doctor Doom, Superman took on Lex Luthor and Roger the Dodger continually tests the patience of those around him. Each time hero meets villain or naughty schoolboy tests his parents we see the characters exploring the outcome. Think bubbles are so good at helping us explore motivations, after all we can’t always be sure what the other person is thinking. Life isn’t like an episode of The Mentalist so the visual metaphors in comic books help us learn our way round relationships and means of communication.

The Comic Strip is one of the greatest storytelling forms ever created and has been around since before the written word. The stories told on the cave walls at Lascaux in southwestern France tell us the stories of Paleolithic hunters and their dreams and escapades.

I realise this is a rather boy-centric view from the titles I’ve mentioned but I’d be interested in knowing what you think of comics and their place in the literary pantheon. There’s probably a thesis in here somewhere…